Here is a summary of the news in the world.

Biden and Putin set to meet at 18th-century Swiss villa for summit

US President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin are due to hold their summit on June 16 in an 18th-century Swiss villa overlooking Lake Geneva, a calming setting for what promises to be heated discussions. Bitter disputes over election interference, cyber attacks, human rights and Ukraine loom over their first face-to-face meeting since Biden took office on January 20.

No breakthrough in UK-EU “sausage war” talks

Britain and the European Union failed on Wednesday to agree on solutions to facilitate post-Brexit trade with Northern Ireland, in a deadlock that not only reinforces mistrust between the two parties, but could also darken an international summit on weekends. Since Britain completed a torturous exit from the EU late last year, relations with Brussels have deteriorated further, with both sides accusing each other of bad faith over part of their trade deal. which covers the movement of goods to Northern Ireland.

“She screams when someone approaches”: traumatized children of Gaza

Three weeks after Suzy Eshkuntana was pulled from the rubble of her house, destroyed by an Israeli airstrike, the six-year-old girl barely spoke except to ask for her mother and her four siblings who were killed that day. . Her life turned upside down, Suzy and her father now live with her uncle, who says she barely eats, doesn’t sleep well, and doesn’t have the will to play.

Philippine President argues with Pacquiao over South China Sea

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte stoked a feud with boxer Manny Pacquiao by criticizing his “shallow” knowledge of foreign policy, after the senator and eight-division champion said he found the leader’s position on the South China Sea was “missing”. In a late-night interview with the SMNI news channel on Tuesday, Duterte said Pacquiao, a senator and close ally, should “study first” before making a decision.

With G7 summit as first stop, Biden embarks on 8-day trip to Europe

US President Joe Biden leaves for Britain on Wednesday on his first overseas trip since taking office, an eight-day mission to rebuild strained transatlantic relations during the Trump era and reframe relations with Russia. The trip represents a test of the Democratic President’s ability to manage and repair relations with key allies who have become disillusioned with President Donald Trump’s trade tariffs and withdrawal from international treaties.

China defends cultural ties with Japan amid nationalist fury online

China’s Foreign Ministry on Wednesday defended the value of cultural exchanges with Japan after Chinese intellectuals came under heavy attack by nationalists online for attending Japanese government-sponsored events for many years. The ministry’s soft tone contrasted with the uncompromising “wolf warrior diplomacy” it often favored on international issues, especially those involving Japan, of which the brutal wartime occupation of China is a touchstone. for Chinese nationalists.

Brexit bureaucracy creates British nightmare for Dutch boat captain

When Dutch boat captain and engineer Ernst-Jan de Groot asked to continue working in Britain after Brexit, he found himself trapped in a bureaucratic nightmare due to an online glitch and said that ‘ he was now at risk of losing his job. Under the new immigration rules coming into force, de Groot risks losing the right to come to Britain to work unless he can successfully apply for a visa through a government website by the end June.

Man held over Macron’s slap was a fan of medieval fencing

The man who allegedly slapped French President Emmanuel Macron ran a club of medieval fencing enthusiasts and had no criminal record, two sources familiar with the investigation said on Wednesday. A police source identified the suspect as Damien Tarel, 28. Acquaintances from his hometown of Saint-Vallier in south-eastern France described a man who loved period role-playing games and didn’t cause problems.

Peruvian left Castillo draws closer to victory in heavily divided election

Peruvian socialist Pedro Castillo retained a slim lead in the country’s deeply divided presidential election on Wednesday with nearly all votes processed, though, with a gap of just 70,000, contested ballots could still be decisive. Castillo, the son of illiterate farmers who rocked the political elite of the Andean nation and garnered huge support from the rural poor, had 50.2% with 99.8% of the votes processed, just 0.4% point percentage ahead of his right-wing rival Keiko Fujimori.

Ahead of summit, EU urges US to ‘speak the word’ on trade disputes

The European Union hopes that next week’s summit with the United States will help quickly end trade disputes and foster a transatlantic alliance to address global trade challenges, the EU trade chief said on Wednesday. , Valdis Dombrovskis.

Joe Biden will travel to Brussels for the first time as US president after four years of close relations under the Trump administration.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)



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